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K021 Three Easy Pieces

deutsch K021 Drei leichte Stücke

K21 Trois pièces faciles

pour piano à quatre mains, main gauche facile – Three Easy Pieces for piano duet, left hand easy — Drei leichte Stücke für Klavier vierhändig, mit leichtem Seconda-Part – Три легкие пьесы для фортепиано в три* руки (левая рука легкая) – Tre pezzi facili per pianoforte a quattro mani, con la parte del basso facilissima

* In principle the Russian term is not incorrect. The original may be called ‘à quatre mains’ = ‘piano duet’, but the second player uses only the left hand.

Perfomance Practice: The technically simplicity of the Secondo part does not divert attention from the technical difficulty of the Primo part. This is also true for the simple, non-structural problems in the 3 pieces. In a letter to Ansermet dated14th February 1916 , Strawinsky dispels ideas of “simplicity”, even though he was characterising them as Music-Hall compositions. The works were not intended for people who played the piano badly.

Construction: Three short, unnumbered, independent pieces for piano duet, with a particularly easy left hand part for the secondo player. Each piece has its own title: Marche – March – Marsch; Valse – Waltz – Walzer; Polka.

Structure

[1.] Marche (March, Marsch)

Crotchet = 80 (42 bars)

[2.] Valse (Waltz, Walzer) (96 bars)

dotted minim = 66 (bar 1 up to bar 16, repeated with a one-bar-long first/second-time bar bar 16)

leggierissimo (bar 17 up to bar 24, repeated with a one-bar-long first/second-time bar bar 24)

D.C. al fine (bar 1 up to bar 16)

TRIO poco rubato (bar 25 up to bar 32, repeated with a two-bar-long first/second-time bar bars 31/32)

D. C. al fine (bar 1 up to bar 16)

[3.] Polka (Polka, Polka) (40 bars)

Crotchet = 96 (bar 1 up to bar 32 with the repetition of bars 1 to 8 with first/second-time bar bar 8)

Style: All three pieces are grotesque in character and exploit the typical technical devices of musically contradictory statements. Among these devices are consciously false grammatical relationships, a musical logic that creates the impression of quirky idiosyncrasy, the garbling of familiar musical quotations, the overturning of formal and logical expectations and melodic phrases twisted out of shape. Virtually all of Strawinsky’s grotesques operate on a formal level, too, attemping to perform little dances and marches whose metrical patterns are strictly observed in a way that is both monotonous and exaggerated, while the melodic line constantly confounds expectations and is prevented from unfolding.

The stiff, solemn March dedicated to Alfredo Casella stands with its trumpet-like fanfares, its spirited, military sense of forward drive in an almost screaming opposition to the patriarchal, grave stamping of the bass meter appearing in a monotonous schema, which continues marching undeterred by all the other musical events. The Waltz, dedicated to Eric Satie, exposes this contradiction between melodic striving and harmonic inertia in what is probably a more convincing fashion. Here it is the scrambled waltz melody, with rhythmic subtleties and small surprise effects, which continually gets into difficulties with the stiffly maintained Waltz schema, wanting to unfold itself freely in all directions and dragging the restrictive bass part behind itself, so to speak. In the Polka, which is dedicated to Diaghilev, a stiffly maintained metrical scheme in the form of a caricatured, exaggerated Polka hopping rhythm marries itself under duress with a simply mechanically reeled-off upper part, which is constantly slipping and sliding. He conceived the Polka as a form of caricature of Diaghilev: Diaghilev as the circus director, who, cracking the whip, has a trainee female rider do her work on the horse; he later also used the term “Dompteur”.

Diaghilev was stunned at first and was unsure whether he should resent this image or not. They then, however, both laughed out loud. The matter was confirmed in a letter from Misia Sert to Jean Cocteau from the second half of 1915. She describes Diaghilev very unpleasantly. He was becoming “fatter and fatter”, his clothes “tighter” and his head “smaller”; rather the circus director, as “Igor says”.

Dedication: à Alfredo Casella [March]; à Erik Satie [Waltz]; à Serge Diaghilew [Polka].

Duration: about 1 ¢ 02 ¢¢ (March), 1 ¢ 20 ¢¢ (Waltz), 0 ¢ 40 ¢¢ (Polka).

Date of origin: Started at Clarens during the winter of 1914/15 and completed at Château d’Oex on 6 March 1915.

History of origin: The only information known about the compositional history is what Strawinsky allowed to be reported in 2 different versions (1935, 1966). After the “memoirs” (not authored by him), he spent the winter of 1914 to 1915 in Clarens, travelling for two weeks during this time to visit Diaghilev in Florence before, upon his return, moving to Château-d’Oex for 2 months for the rest of the winter, without giving up Clarens, out of concern for the shaky state of his wife’s health. He must have written the piano pieces in this period because he brought them with him when he visited Diaghilev shortly after his move (2nd January 1915 ) on8th February 1915 . The dating is limited by the earthquake in Avezzanno (13rd January 1915 ), which put allItaly into shock and the shocks of which could be felt all the way to Château-d’Oex. By this point, as Strawinsky explained, he had completed all 3 pieces. the version that he later gave almost 30 years later in his dialogue with Craft runs very differently; he goes much more deeply into the details. According to this version, he wrote the 3 pieces in Morges in 1915 before “Renard” (the 5 pieces written later came after “Renard”), and first was the Polka caricature of Diaghilev with the especially simple Secondo part to account for Diaghilev’s not particularly developed piano technique. Alfredo Casella was present in the hotel room at the performance of the Polka inMilan and was so enthusiastic that he, Strawinsky, promised to write him a similar piece. This is how the “March” was written, shortly after his return to Morges. To this, he added a little later the “Valse”, capturing his memory of a visit to Eric Satie inParis . Questions arise regarding the position of the 2nd depiction in the compositional history. If he in fact played the Polka for the first time to Diaghilev in 1915 in Milan in the presence of Casella, why then do the sketches of the “Marche”, customized to Casella – Strawinsky included the name Casella graphically in the title! – have the date19/12/1914 ! How could he have completed the 3 pieces before “Renard” with the date Morges (!)1915, when “Renard” was begun at Château-d’Oex in February 1915 at the latest, so before his stay in Morges. One can only find a solution to the chronological confusion of the two versions if one retains the compositional order, but takes a step back and accepts that Diaghilev probably came to know the Polka in the early winter of 1914, probably during Strawinsky’s visit toFlorence . This speculation is supported by the dates in the surviving sketches. From the dates in the sketches and the investigations employed by Craft, it can be seen that Strawinsky completed the Polka whilst still in Clarens on15th November 1914 in the version for four hands. The March follows four weeks later and on the same day as the date on the elaborately coloured original manuscript (19th December 1914), he completed a neat version on printed manuscript paper with a few small changes and added in notes in pencil for the orchestration. The March was completed at this point, according to this. The Waltz was completed on6th March 1915 in Château-d’Oex. The period of composition can therefore be established as lasting approximately 6 months.

First performance: 22 April 1918 in the Salle du Conservatoire in Lausanne by Nino Rossi and Ernest Ansermet.

Remarks: All three pieces are occasional works redolent of a music hall or coffee house. Although Strawinsky’s various accounts of the circumstances surrounding their genesis seem self-contradictory, it appears that they were written over a period of around six months. The chaos of war had left the composer with little choice but to cast round for a new publisher, as the roads to Jurgenson in Moscow, to Koussevitzky in Berlin and to Schott in Mainz were all more or less barred. Strawinsky turned his attention to Ricordi in Milan, and in this he received the backing of a whole series of friends. But Ricordi rejected his approach, presumably because the firm felt unable to accept his demand for a fee of 25,000 Swiss francs. It can be seen from a letter from Strawinsky to Ansermet inNew York dated14th February 1916 from Morges that Strawinsky found himself in high spirits due to the American as well as the Italian successes. The letter concerns the intended acceptance of the piano pieces for four hands (3 hands) by the publishers under Ansermet’s protection; the 5 simple piano pieces had not yet been written. Ansermet, in whose house in Clarens Strawinsky was living at the time, confirmed by cable on7th April 1916 that he had received the music. The letter does not state to which publishing house this appertains, but Strawinsky instructed Ansermet to demand for the performance rights alone of the 3 easy pieces, a 2-hand piano version and an orchestrated version for small ensemble that had evidently already been completed the pretty horrendous sum of 25,000 Swiss Francs under the condition that Swiss Francs were not in a worse position than the French ones. The rights of mechanical reproduction were specifically not included in this sum, which, as a result of the Music-Hall structure, must have made the matter of no interest to the publishers.Strawinsky’s outgoings were currently around 2500 francs a month. Prior to the October Revolution he had received the equivalent of some 11,000 Swiss francs a month from his estates in Russia, and from 1919 he had to feed no fewer than eleven mouths. Following Ricordi’s rejection of his demand, the Three Easy Pieces were published by the small Geneva firm of Adolphe Henn. It was a makeshift solution, as Henn was more of a bookseller with few publishing facilities of his own, but he acted as Chester’s Swiss distributor.

Situationsgeschichte: Grotesques played an important, if curious, part in classicistically orientated modern music, not the music of the circle associated with Schoenberg and Webern – and fulfilled several functions at once, serving not only to mock old emotional values but also to characterize contradictory situations. Sometimes these portraits were malicious, at other times affectionate. In France in particular they were used to lend a touch of irony to programme music by consciously exaggerating the implausibility of the texts that were in clear opposition to the music. By the same token, they allowed compositional and formal innovations to be introduced into the music under the cover of witticisms and enabled weaker composers to recycle outmoded forms of music-making under the pretext of caricature, so that light-hearted scorn increasingly gave way to a direct imitation of Classicism. In the end the genre was so widespread that a special album of grotesques appeared in 1926. Much of this may be due to Erik Satie, but Strawinsky’s little Polka also played its part in this development, for according to Casella’s account of its genesis, it proved so popular with its listeners that its performance was able to inspire a whole new genre. Strawinsky’s own enthusiasm for these small-scale works is clear not only from the unusually high fee that he demanded for them and from the eagerness with which he sent out copies of the work but also and above all from his wittily executed sketches, with their crayon doodles, including not only Casella’s name but also the word ‘Galopp’ in which the letter ‘p’ was repeated several times, each letter smaller than its predecessor [PPpp . . .] and by catching the rhythm replicating the dying sound of a horse galloping away with increasing distance from the viewer, a self-referential playfulness that reflects Strawinsky’s own delight in the work.

Versions: The first of the three pieces to appear in print was the Polka, which was published in a French periodical in 1915, albeit without its dedication to Diaghilev. All three then appeared in 1917 in a simple landscape-format edition published by Adolphe Henn of Geneva for which Strawinsky was paid 290 francs. Henn printed 1000 copies. By 29 November 1919 he had sold 214 and given away another 40. Together with the other works by the composer that Henn had published, 650 copies of the Three Easy Pieces were later made over to Chester in London (the remaining 98 were presumably trade copies), and Chester duly produced a new edition in 1925. All three pieces were repeatedly transcribed and arranged for other forces. There is much to be said for the hypothesis that all three, or at least the Polka, were originally intended for piano solo. At all events, Strawinsky prepared a two-handed transcription of the version for piano duet on 23 March 1915, although this arrangement remained unpublished. Also in 1915 Strawinsky transcribed the Polka for Aladar Racz, a cimbalom player whom he held in particularly high regard and whose repertory of pieces he was keen to enlarge. He transposed the piece a whole tone lower as Racz’s instrument did not include the f sharp ¢¢¢ that appears in the penultimate bar of the original. This transcription, too, was unpublished during the composer’s lifetime, although a facsimile of the manuscript appeared in 1962 within the framework of a reminiscence published by Racz’s widow, Yvonne Racz-Barblan, in the Lausanne-based periodical Feuilles musicales: ‘ Une transcription inédite d’Igor Strawinsky: Polka pour cymbalum ’, Feuilles musicales, XV/2–3 (March/April 1962), 37–39. The facsimile, measuring approx. 4.5 x 7, appears on page 38.* Strawinsky, who strenuously objected to the article’s content, also toyed with the idea of adding a small instrumental ensemble to the cimbalom transcription, completing a version for twelve instruments later that same year. Dated 25 March 1915, it too remained unpublished. It is clear from surviving sketches that Strawinsky also worked on a two-handed piano arrangement of the Waltz and Polka in 1914–15. Neither arrangement was published. A letter to Ernest Ansermet of 14 March 1916 additionally refers to the existence of a two-handed arrangement of all three pieces as well as an orchestral version. We know about a further instrumental arrangement – this time of the March for seven instruments – only from various spoken remarks by Strawinsky. At some date between 1917 (and probably even earlier) and 1925, the Five Easy Pieces were combined with the Three Easy Pieces and orchestrated to produce two suites made up of four pieces each. In 1925 Chester reprinted the old Henn edition with a French main title, following it up with a further edition with an English title. The lack of library copies with relevant cataloguing details means that we can only speculate on the date of this edition, which remained on the market until Chester was taken over by Hansen-Verlag, when the latter brought out a new edition with a different imprint. According to the cataloguing data of the Deutsche Bücherei in Leipzig, this edition appeared in 1965 (7 pp.; 27.8 x 20.3 (oblong 8°); pl. no. J.W.C. 2910 1, J.W.C. 2910 2and J.W.C. 2910 3). Musyka of Moscow published both the Three Easy Pieces and the Five Easy Pieces in 1968. These pieces seem to have been less threatened by pirated editions than other popular works by the composer. In 1969 Omega Music Edition of New York reprinted the Three Easy Pieces together with the Five Easy Pieces. Gerard Alphenaar added the fingering missing from Strawinsky’s original, thus ensuring Omega’s copyright.

* This particular issue of the Feuilles musicales is extremely rare, but a copy may be consulted in the Musikwissenschaftliches Institut of the University in Mainz.

Historical recording: None traceable.

CD edition: Only in the orchestral version.

Autograph: The whereabouts of the autograph are currently unknown. Shortly after finishing the works, Strawinsky gave the complete sketch material as a present to André Gide.

Copyright: 1917 by Ad[olphe] Henn, Geneva; J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London.

Editions

a) Overview

21-1 1915 Polka; [unidentified]

21-2 (1917); Henn + Chester; 7 p.; A.67 H.

    21-2(19) (1919);

21-3 [1920+]; Chester London; 7 p.; J.W.C.2910 1-3; 136.

    21-3[25] [1925] ibd.

21-4 [-1952] englische Ausgabe; Chester London; 7 p.; J.W.C.2910 1-3.

21-5 1949 [Gerard Alphenaar]; Omega Music Edition New York; 7 p.; Pl.-Nr. GA-1001.

21-6 1962 Polka (Cymbalum) [Racz] Faksimile; Feuilles musicales XV/2-3, p. 38.

21-7 [1965]; Hansen; 7 p.; J.W.C. 2910 1-3.

21-8Alb 1968; Editions Musique Moscou; 7 p.; 5064.

b) Characteristic features

21-1 1915 Polka [unidentified].

21-2 IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES FACILES / POUR / PIANO A QUATRE MAINS / (MAIN GAUCHE FACILE) / [#] MARCHE [#] VALSE [#] POLKA [#] / [left:] Edition AD.° HENN, GENÈVE. / Copyright 1917 by Ad.° Henn. / Net Fr. 2.50 / [right:] Propriété de l'auteur pour tous pays. / Tous droits d'exécution, de reproduction / et d'arrangement réservés pour tous / pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suéde / et la Norvège / [°°] // [at the top of the page flush right:] MARCHE [#] VALSE [#] POLKA // (Edition [ library binding] 27.2 x 19.5 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); 7 [7] pages + 4 cover pages black on grey [framed front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > du mÊme auteur / sous presse:<* without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 3 pages back matter [empty pages]; title head as movement title >Marche< >Valse< >Polka<; dedications above movement title centre italic pages of the score paginated p. 1 >à Alfredo CASELLA< p. 4 >à Erik SATIE< p. 6 >à Serge DIAGHILEW<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1, 4 below movement title p. 6 between dedication and movement title flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations below type area p. 1 flush left partly in italics > Edition Ad. HENN, Genève, Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. < flush right italic > Propriété de l'auteur pour tous pays< oblong on the right edge printed centred >TOUS DROITS D'EXÉCUTION, D'ARRANGEMENTS ET DE REPRODUCTION / RÉSERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS, Y COMPRIS LE DANEMARK, LA SUÈDE ET LA NORVÈGE.< p. 4, 6 flush left partly in italics >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn.<; plate number >A.67 H.<; end of score dated p. 7 partly in italics > Clarens, 1915.<; production indication p. 7 below type area flush left >A. FOUGERAY, Imp. Paris.<**) // (1917)

° Different spelling original.

°° The copy in what was formerly the Prussian State Library, >DMS O. 54302<, contains a stamp >COPYRIGHT / for all Countries. / [wavy line] / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd. / LONDON, W.1.< inside the frame next to and underneath the section on the left, and outside the frame on the upper part of the page in the middle, there is a stamp >NET. 2/6< with the statement of place cut of.

* Compositions are advertised laid out >CINQ PIÈCES FACILES pour PIANO A QUATRE MAINS. / (MAIN DROITE FACILE.) / PRIBAOUTKI, CHANSONS PLAISANTES pour une voix et huit instruments, mises en français / par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / BERCEUSES DU CHAT, SUITE DE CHANTS pour une voix de femme et trois clarinettes, mises en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / RENARD, HISTOIRE BURLESQUE EN UN ACTE, pour quatre voix d'hommes et orchestre de / chambre, mise en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / Edition AD. HENN — GENÈVE. [#] Propriété de l'auteur pour tous pays.< [° the curly bracket, which is two-lines tall, encompasses the lines beginning with a) and b)].

21-2(19)

[The original copies of the first Henn edition, that were passed over to Chester, have both on the left edge of the cover page above the legal reservation and on the title page in the middle of the bottom half of the page the stamp >COPYRIGHT / for all Countries. / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd. / LONDON, W.1.<, as well as an additional stamp on the bottom part of the title page in the middle, >NET. 2/6<.]

21-3 EDITION CHESTER, No. 136.° / IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES FACILES / POUR / PIANO A QUATRE MAINS / (MAIN GAUCHE FACILE) / MARCHE [#] VALSE [#] POLKA / LONDON: / J. & CHESTER, LTD., [#] / PRICE 2/- NET. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W.1. // [title page = front cover title] // ( Piano edition for four hands [library binding] 28 x 19,4 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); 7 [7] pages + 4 cover pages black on dark (green) brown beige [framed front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >ŒUVRES DE / MANUEL DE FALLA / Publiées par J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd.< without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >LES GRANDS SUCCES DES / BALLETS RUSSES<* without production date; piece title >Marche< >Valse< >Polka< as title head; dedications above title head centre italic p. 1 >à Alfredo CASELLA< p. 4 >à Erik SATIE p. 6 >à Serge DIAGHILEW<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1, p. 4 below, p. 6 next to title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations below type area 1st page of the score, p. 4, 6 flush left partly in italics >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London.< flush right centred >Tous droits réservés / All rights reserved<; plate numbers p. 1-3 [Marche] >J.W.C. 2910 1< p. 4-5 [Valse] J.W.C. 2910 2< p. 6-7 [Polka] >J.W.C. 2910 3<; end of score dated p. 7 partly in italics >Clarens, 1915<; without end mark) // [1920]

° Flush left outside the border.

* Compositions are advertised with price information by >ROSSINI-RESPIGHI>, >SCARLATTI-TOMMASINI>, >MANUEL DE FALLA< and >IGOR STRAWINSKY* / Pulcinella (d’après Pergolesi).* / Partition pour piano seul° 15s. 0d. net. / Renard.* Partition pour chant et piano° 15s. 0d. net.< [° fill character (dots in groups of three); * centre].

21-3[25] [missing] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES FACILES / POUR / PIANO A QUATRE MAINS / (MAIN GAUCHE FACILE) / MARCHE [#] VALSE [#] POLKA / LONDON: J. & CHESTER, LTD., [#] PRICE 2/- NET. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W. 1.] // ( Piano edition for four hands [library binding and stark trimmed] 26.8 x 18.2 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); 7 [7] pages + [cover pages missing] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 3 pages back matter [2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Handbook of Miniature / Orchestral and Chamber/ MUSIC SCORES<] without production date; piece title as title head; dedicationes above piece title centre centred italic 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 >à Alfredo CASELLA< p. 4 >à Erik SATIE< p. 6 >à Serge DIAGHILEW<; author specified p. 1, 4 below p. 6 next to piece title flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations p. 1, 4, 6 below type area flush left centred partly in italics >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London.< flush right centred >Tous droits réservés / All rights reserved<; plate numbers p. 1-3 >J.W.C. 2910 1< >S. 4-5 >W.C. 2910 2< >S. 6-7 J.W.C. 2910 3<; end of score dated p. 7 partly in italics >Clarens, 1915<; without end marks) // [1925]

21-4 IGOR STRAWINSKY / THREE EASY PIECES / FOR / PIANO DUET / (LEFT HAND EASY) / MARCH [#] WALTZ [#] POLKA / °LONDON: / °J. & W. CHESTER, LTD., [#] °°PRICE 3/- NET. / °11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W.1. [#] °°(Revised Price) // (Piano edition stapled 28,1 x 20,3 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); t he Seconda part is printed in one system under the Prima part; 7 [7] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on cloudy structure grey [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >SELECTED WORKS / for / PIANO DUET<* without production date] without front matter [without title page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head as piece title >March<; dedicationes above piece title >March< >Waltz< >Polka< centre italic p. 1 >à Alfredo CASELLA< p. 4 >à Erik SATIE< p. 6 >à Serge DIAGHILEW<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 next to and below, p. 4 below, p. 6 next to piece title flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations below type area p. 1, 4, 6 flush left partly in italics >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate numbers p. 1-3 [March] >J.W.C. 2910 1<, p. 4-5 [Waltz] >J.W.C. 2910 2<, p. 6-7 [Polka] >J.W.C. 2910 3<; production indication p. 1., 6 [not p. 4] below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; end of score dated p. 7 flush right partly in italics >Clarens, 1915<) // [-1952]

° On the left side of the page.

°° On the right side of the page.

* Compositions are advertised without columns division from >Lord Berners< to >G. Tailleferre< [A. Casella, M. de Falla, A. Jarnefelt, J. Jongen, G. F. Malipiero, F. Poulenc, I. Stravinsky], amongst these >I. Stravinsky [#] THREE PIECES (Easy Bass Part) / [#] FIVE PIECES (Easy Treble Part)<.

21-5 1949 Reprint edition Gerard Alphenaar; Omega Music Edition New York; 7 p.; Pl.-Nr. GA-1001 [unidentified]

21-6 1962 Polka (Cymbalum) [Racz] Faksimile; in: Yvonne Racz-Barblan: Une transcription inédite d'Igor Stravinsky, Feuilles musicales: Polka pour cymbalum, Feuilles Musicales, XV/2-3, edition März-April Lausanne 1962, pp. 37-39, Autotypie ca. 4.5 x 7 p. 38.

21-7 IGOR STRAVINSKY / THREE EASY PIECES / FOR / PIANO DUET / (LEFT HAND EASY)* / MARCH [#] WALTZ [#] POLKA / NORSK MUSIKFORLAG A/S [#**] WILHELM HANSEN, MUSIK-FORLAG / OSLO [#**] COPENHAGEN / A.B. NORDISKA MUSIKFORLAGET [#**] WILHELMIANA MUSIKVERLAG / STOCKHOLM [#**] FRANKFURT a. M. / ( Piano edition [library binding] 27.9 x 20.2 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); 7 [7] pages + 4 cover pages thinner cardboard or thicker paper white on light dark green [front cover title, 2 empty pages, empty page with centre centred Chester Vignette ø 3 [letter combination] without front matter + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s (Chester) advertisements >SELECTED WORKS for PIANO DUET<*** without production date]; piece title as title head; dedications above piece title centre italic [p. 1:] >à Alfredo CASELLA< [p. 4:] >à Erik SATIE< [p. 6:] >à Serge DIAGHILEW<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1, p. 4, p. 6 below piece title flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; legal reservation p. 1, 4, 6 below type area flush left partly in italics >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London.°< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication p. 1, 4, 6 below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate numbers [p.1-3 (March):] J.W.C. 2910 1, [p. 4-5 (Waltz):] J.W.C. 2910 2, [p. 6-7 (Polka):] J.W.C. 2910 3; end of score dated p. 7 >Clarens, 1915; without end mark) // [1965****]

° Page 4 >London< without dot instead of >London.< (on page 4, the full stop is missing after this word).

* The Seconda part is printed in one system under the Prima part.

** Round Chester vignette ø 3 cm spanning 4 lines.

*** Compositions are advertised from > Lord Berners < to > G. Tailleferre <, amongst these > I. Stravinsky [#] THREE PIECES (Easy Bass Part) / [#] FIVE PIECES (Easy Treble Part)<.

**** Dating according to the entry in the Deutsche Bücherei, Leipzig for copy M 1968/A/185) and according to Hofmeister.

21-8Alb Stravinsky* / И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ // IGOR STRAVINSKY / ŒUVRES POUR PIANO / VOLUME / I / EDITIONS MUSIQUE MOSCOU · 1968 // ИГОРЬ СТРАВИНСКИЙ / СОЧИНЕНИЯ ДЛЯ ФОРТЕПИАНО / ТОМ / I / ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО МУЗЫКА · МОСКВА · 1968 // [Text on spine:] ИГОРЬ СТРАВИНСКИЙ 1° СОЧИНЕНИЯ ДЛЯ ФОРТЕПИАНО // (Album 1.6 x 22 [22.3] x 28.9 [29,4] [Lex 8°]; 143 [143] pages + 4 pages bound in imitation leather [front cover title black on cream white, 2 empty pages red, empty page cream] + 8 pages front matter (including binding sides) [empty page red, empty page white, whole-page portrait of the young Strawinsky facing left, 2 empty pages, title page French, title page Russian, editors specified Russian >Составлние и редакция / А. КОНДРАТЬЕВА и К. СОРОКИНА< French >Complétés et rédigés par / A. KONDRATJEV et K. SOROKINE<] + 7 pages backmatter (included binding sides) [page with annotation >ПРИМЕЧАНИЯ< with notes about the genesis of the work and dedications Russian, index >СОДЕРЖАНИЕ< Russian, imprint Russian >Индекс 9-4-4< with billing of names >Редактор А. Бакулов / Художник В. Антипов / Худож . редактор Г. Христиани / Техн. редактор В. Кичороская < and itemized statements of format and origin, 3 empty pages, empty page red]; reprint p. 119-125; title head >ТРИ ЛЕГКИЕ ПЬЕСЫ [#] TROIS PIÈCES FACILES / Для фортепиано в три руки [#] Pour piano à trois mains / (левая рука легкая) [#] (main gauche facile)<; Russian-Frenche piece title in arabic numerals (without dot) p. 119-121 (>1 / МАРШ [#] MARCHE<), p. 122-123 (>2 / ВАЛЬС [#] VALSE<), p. 124-125 (>3 / ПОЛЬКА [#] POLKA<); plate number >5064<; without author specified, without legal reservations and without without acknowledging the original publishers on the pages of the scores, without end marks) // 1968

° Vertical to text.

* An imprinted, stylized signature risen up in cream on bream white with a first letter the size of the entire page.


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

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